pH buffering

Discuss fermentation, different types of wash, etc
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Easydrinker
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Re: pH buffering

Post by Easydrinker » Tue Oct 29, 2019 11:24 pm

All of my washes, including whisky, nose dive to a Very low Ph by day two or three.
I am sure they would all finish without intervention, but Sodium Bicarb, does seem to speed things up.
And is cheap.
Organic I am not here. :)

Robert.
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Jennysgin
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Re: pH buffering

Post by Jennysgin » Wed Oct 30, 2019 7:56 am

Tbh I generally just check and fix it on day 2 or 3 too. I'm just experimenting to see if there is a hands-free option :geek:

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Re: pH buffering

Post by Easydrinker » Wed Oct 30, 2019 10:53 pm

From what I recall of previous, old buffering posts, they involved pre-mixing buffers, which may or not be needed.
And were hands on from before the go
I think that sorting problems as they arise is the way to go here.
But that is JMO.

Robert.
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"Everyone's happy. Everyone's smiling. No-One here is sad anymore" :D

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StillBrewing
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Re: pH buffering

Post by StillBrewing » Sat Nov 02, 2019 6:33 am

When I first started out I used buffers. Didn't take me long to realise that it was an added expense that wasn't really needed. The size of one buffer turned out to be enough to treat quite a few washes throughout the fermentation.

Just keeping an eye on it and adjusting twice through fermentation is enough for me and saves the pennies along the way.

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Re: pH buffering

Post by Easydrinker » Mon Nov 04, 2019 1:01 am

StillBrewing wrote:
Sat Nov 02, 2019 6:33 am
When I first started out I used buffers. Didn't take me long to realise that it was an added expense that wasn't really needed. The size of one buffer turned out to be enough to treat quite a few washes throughout the fermentation.

Just keeping an eye on it and adjusting twice through fermentation is enough for me and saves the pennies along the way.
That says it all. :)
Don't work harder than you need to.
I am sure that a Zen master, or wordsmith could say it better, but try a lttle "hands on" experience, you will start to fly!

Robert.
There is no ONE way.
"Everyone's happy. Everyone's smiling. No-One here is sad anymore" :D

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phantom
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Re: pH buffering

Post by phantom » Tue Nov 05, 2019 3:16 am

Well many of the "usual suspects" for buffering ferments have been tried and tested in the "mead world".

Given that with "traditional" meads (honey, water, nutrients, yeast) are famed for dropping pH and becoming stuck (that happens when the pH drops to being <3.0pH), yet the aim is usually to highlight the original flavour of the honey, it seems that the best one for not affecting flavour (so no salty or chalky/powdery flavour notes) is potassium carbonate.

I don't have any detail i.e. dosage per gallon/litre/whatever, as I've been lucky and not had any stuck ferments.

Some of the HB types across the pond also say about the limited buffering ability of yeast hulls - not seen those, so I've used boiled bread yeast in the past........

Just my two penneth...........

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Easydrinker
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Re: pH buffering

Post by Easydrinker » Tue Nov 05, 2019 9:59 pm

A hundred and twenty two penneth maketh a pound.
Or it did!
Every little helps..... :)

Robert.
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"Everyone's happy. Everyone's smiling. No-One here is sad anymore" :D

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myles
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Re: pH buffering

Post by myles » Sun Nov 10, 2019 10:38 am

I just downloaded my full water analysis.
To be honest it does not mean much to me, Perhaps I need a brewing guru to talk me through it.

Most of the time I find with fruit and rum washes that they generally do OK.

My rum is a mix of mostly demerrara sugar with treacle. By standard mix is 21 kg demerrara with 2 kg treacle to which I add a 220ml bottle of lemon juice on the first run. Perhaps I am just lucky but it usually ferments out fine.

My fruit has a split sugar addition. I ferment the fruit for a few days and then add the remaining sugar. Blackcurrants can be really acid but even those seem to ferment out ok.

I always use a starter culture. I mix up the wash, dilute it by 50% in a demijon and pitch the yeast. When that is going I dump it in the fermenter.

The only times I have really had issues is with a cold wash in the fermenter. Then I re pitch the yeast in a new fermenter and slowly add the wash into the active yeast over a day or two to allow it to warm up.

I suspect folks may try to start with an SG that is too high. That will cause issues. Treat the yeast with care and it should manage OK.

OR I have just been lucky and my water has reasonable qualities to start with.

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Re: pH buffering

Post by Mash » Mon Nov 11, 2019 8:08 am

I think you said it all there.

Furry kettles are a very good sign you will have happy yeast.

Temperature control is a massive thing. If we had to suffer a 5-10c daily variation and could do nothing to about it we would be stressed and lethargic too.
To Gin-finity and beyond !

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Re: pH buffering

Post by Easydrinker » Tue Nov 12, 2019 3:08 am

myles wrote:
Sun Nov 10, 2019 10:38 am
I just downloaded my full water analysis.
To be honest it does not mean much to me, Perhaps I need a brewing guru to talk me through it.

Most of the time I find with fruit and rum washes that they generally do OK.

My rum is a mix of mostly demerrara sugar with treacle. By standard mix is 21 kg demerrara with 2 kg treacle to which I add a 220ml bottle of lemon juice on the first run. Perhaps I am just lucky but it usually ferments out fine.

My fruit has a split sugar addition. I ferment the fruit for a few days and then add the remaining sugar. Blackcurrants can be really acid but even those seem to ferment out ok.

I always use a starter culture. I mix up the wash, dilute it by 50% in a demijon and pitch the yeast. When that is going I dump it in the fermenter.

The only times I have really had issues is with a cold wash in the fermenter. Then I re pitch the yeast in a new fermenter and slowly add the wash into the active yeast over a day or two to allow it to warm up.

I suspect folks may try to start with an SG that is too high. That will cause issues. Treat the yeast with care and it should manage OK.

OR I have just been lucky and my water has reasonable qualities to start with.
That is one hell of a post, drawing upon many different aspects that may be in play here.
I have my water report, and understand it, I think.
I don't have a "furry" kettle, (nice, simple opt. out for some) and I choose to do other stuff, (adding minerals and the like) with some of my beer washes.
Spirit runs seem to look after me/themselves, rough as I treat them.
So far.
Water is water, innit?
Actually,no..
Compare your analysis to one from Burton upon Trent.
No disrespct intended, but you are so ahead of me with so much else, you surprise me here.
Surely, one of the reasons a forum like this exists?.
Somewhere that folk can discuss stuff?

I freely admit to sometimes espousing bollocks.
But, I also have no shame.
And if i can make one person communicate with another, on what to some is a valid subject, Job done.



Robert.
There is no ONE way.
"Everyone's happy. Everyone's smiling. No-One here is sad anymore" :D

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