Yeast question

Discuss fermentation, different types of wash, etc
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Valorie
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Yeast question

Post by Valorie »

I'm from the States so just making sure yeast types/terms are the same as those talked about in the forum since so many of you are from different countries. So the Birdwatchers wash and others I'm finding call for bakers yeast...is this the same as bread yeast and active dry yeast? I use EC-1118 all the time in winemaking and wonder if this would also be an acceptable yeast for a sugar wash? And would you recommend one over the other? I used turbo yeast in my very first wash and I'm thinking a different yeast would be a better choice.

Thanks!
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Easydrinker
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Re: Yeast question

Post by Easydrinker »

EC-1118 will work, but a plain baker's yeast, not an activated one will cost less.
Basically, for a neutral wash, you want the cheapest bread yeast that you can find.
I don't use a breadmaker, but suspect that "active" yeasts are a marketing ploy invented for these machines.

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Mash
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Re: Yeast question

Post by Mash »

Yup, what he said.

Just a simple bread yeast. A wholesaler or bakery supply should supply this (dried and vac packed) for a few bucks per pound.
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Valorie
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Re: Yeast question

Post by Valorie »

Thanks! I have a vacuum sealed brick of bread yeast from a warehouse market that I'm assuming should work great then 😊
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Easydrinker
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Re: Yeast question

Post by Easydrinker »

Depending upon the size of your brick, and your frequency of mashing, if you own a vac packer, weigh out a suitable number of portions, bag and keep in the fridge is best.
Re-vac your brick, it will keep for years in the fridge, longer in the freezer. :)
TBH, I find that bread yeast doesn't need such attention, but routinely do it with bulk bought dry wine and beer yeast.
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Elecrafter
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Re: Yeast question

Post by Elecrafter »

Just as an aside, I do have a breadmaking machine, and I can confirm the Non activated yeast does not work as well as the yeast made for the bread machines. It does not rise as well. So suspect the Bread machine yeast may have some nutrients to make it rise a bit faster.
I think the proving / rising times are shorter, hence needing a yeast that works a little faster.

Just my 2d's worth.

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Mash
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Re: Yeast question

Post by Mash »

Yeah. I sort of know what you mean.

I make all our bread, and "activated" does seem quicker. I have added all manner of dry yeasts (bread, wine and whiskey) directly to the mix. No hydration, but I have an autolysis break.

The Internet seemed to spew all manner of shite when I tried to find out a few years ago.
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Re: Yeast question

Post by Easydrinker »

I view all yeast usage advice as a " suck it, and see".
Folk have differing extenuating circumstances, water ph, etc..

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Re: Yeast question

Post by Mash »

... Bicarb 🤦‍♂️.

Good point that man.
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Easydrinker
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Re: Yeast question

Post by Easydrinker »

As y'all know, I am a big user of Sodium Bicarbonate.
My tap water ph is around 7.2, but it sure matters to some of my ferments.
I buy SB in bulk.
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phantom
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Re: Yeast question

Post by phantom »

Hum? so the bicarb is to buffer the pH?

If so, I'd suggest a small change. A few years back some in the mead world did some tests with which carbonate seems to do the best job.

The result was potassium carbonate, as it had all the benefits but none of the downsides of the sodium based ones and even potassium bicarbonate.
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billythekid
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Re: Yeast question

Post by billythekid »

I'm from the U.S. as well.

I've used EC 1118 in a UJSSM, and it produced excellent flavors but took forever to ferment out.

I've used RedStar bread yeast from Costco for sugar wash, and it produced less ABV than Turbo but a superior neutral.

Recently, I've been experimenting with Saf Instant Gold. More expensive then RedStar, but much less than either Turbo or EC 1118. It's a bread yeast that's intended to handle high sugar content, such as Panettone.

Bill
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Easydrinker
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Re: Yeast question

Post by Easydrinker »

For me, it is less the brand of yeast used, and more the ph that the wash dips to.
Never a problem with beer,
Wine and neutral washes slow down a lot.
I have given up questioning, and spoon in Sodium Bicarb.
Problem solved.
I started my first, store bought honey mead, maybe 6/7 weeks ago, included a little Lemon juice.
Wrong!
It took the bi-carb, added several days later to start a ferment.
Tonight I started a Mead ferment with the rinsed, crushed, comb from my own bees.
Surprised that it was showing sub.4 on the ph meter.
Added Bicarb.
Added yeast.
It is off and running.
Happy daze.

Robert.
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