Vegetables

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Easydrinker
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Re: Vegetables

Post by Easydrinker »

With a little thought, and a friendly welder, a double handed/sided bolt could be the answer.

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Mash
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Re: Vegetables

Post by Mash »

What is your design for the connecting bit.

A slot in the door, to allow for a 'H' shaped bolt?
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Easydrinker
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Re: Vegetables

Post by Easydrinker »

Yes, a slot.
Simplest solution that I see.

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Re: Vegetables

Post by Mash »

I have found an easier one.

A 'gifted' Upvc half glazed back door and frame. Bonza!
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Re: Vegetables

Post by Easydrinker »

Sounds a bit swank to me!

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Re: Vegetables

Post by myles »

My pumpkin bed is getting away nicely.
This year I built a sturdy A frame support structure out of oak square section timber. 40 mm x 40 mm bolted together with 8mm coach bolts.
Pumpkin frame.png
I have Potimarron Winter squashes that have already climbed to the top of the structure. Butternut squashes that are a bit slow, but are finally climbing. Courgettes that have already been harvested twice. 1 plant of Sicilian Snake that is climbing rapidly, and green and white UFO summer squashes.

In the greenhouse the grape vine is above head height, tomatoes are flowering the 4th or 5th truss, Chilli's, and peppers are flowering well, as are the Aubergines. I have a few Tree Chilies this year that are already nearly 3' tall. I have a single miniature white cucumber (that is enough!!!) that is already producing fruit.

I am just lifting my Charlotte potatoes and am expecting 3 sacks. The second crop Charlotte's are planted in containers. We have harvested Peas, Beetroot, Fennel, and leaf beet. The early carrots were not a success though!!

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Re: Vegetables

Post by Mash »

Our new polytunnel is intended to be a shared space, for growing and enjoying those evenings where its "lovely but ___". Now covered it will be fantastic, but it is very late to they party.

At 30 x 50 it will be smashing. But the delay is solely because Northern polytunnels are clowns and I cannot say better than just avoid, unless you know exactly what you want and have done all the maths yourself. They supplied a complete poly that was impossible to build.

@myles. That pumpkin frame is very well built, can I ask why that shape?
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Re: Vegetables

Post by myles »

Mash wrote:
Wed Jul 21, 2021 6:10 am

@myles. That pumpkin frame is very well built, can I ask why that shape?
Sure, the climbing/trailing varieties (Potimarron, Butternut, Sicilian Snake and climbing yellow courgette) will be trained in horizontal tiers on the top half of the frame. The bush varieties of courgette and UFO summer squash will then get light underneath. With luck there will be a lot of weight of winter squashes hanging on the upper section.

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Re: Vegetables

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myles wrote:
Tue Jul 20, 2021 11:19 pm
My pumpkin bed is getting away nicely.
This year I built a sturdy A frame support structure out of oak square section timber. 40 mm x 40 mm bolted together with 8mm coach bolts.
Pumpkin frame.png

I have Potimarron Winter squashes that have already climbed to the top of the structure. Butternut squashes that are a bit slow, but are finally climbing. Courgettes that have already been harvested twice. 1 plant of Sicilian Snake that is climbing rapidly, and green and white UFO summer squashes.

In the greenhouse the grape vine is above head height, tomatoes are flowering the 4th or 5th truss, Chilli's, and peppers are flowering well, as are the Aubergines. I have a few Tree Chilies this year that are already nearly 3' tall. I have a single miniature white cucumber (that is enough!!!) that is already producing fruit.

I am just lifting my Charlotte potatoes and am expecting 3 sacks. The second crop Charlotte's are planted in containers. We have harvested Peas, Beetroot, Fennel, and leaf beet. The early carrots were not a success though!!
My comment:
That is well early Fennel, if you are talking bulb, hat's off to you.

Robert.
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myles
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Re: Vegetables

Post by myles »

Yes bulb fennel started with heat.

The climbing squashes are planted at each end to grow up to the roof of the frame, with the bush varieties in the middle.
Pumpkin frame 2.png
Pumpkin frame 3.png
In the greenhouse the grape is growing well. Next year there will only be the grape on that side of the greenhouse. It has only been in there since the spring. Bought it at the last continental market in Carlisle.
grape.png
The two horizontal branches (behind the tomatoes) are nearly at the ends of the greenhouse. We will end up with a permanent structure of vertical branches growing up the support wires.

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Re: Vegetables

Post by Mash »

Can I recommend some good secateurs, grape vines can grow.

What variety are you growing?
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Re: Vegetables

Post by myles »

Mash wrote:
Thu Jul 22, 2021 6:48 am

What variety are you growing?
:lol: No idea. Don't even know if it is red or white!!!!!

It was a spur of the moment purchase. :)

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Re: Vegetables

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A few years ago I had friends, in the south, with a vine planted outdoors. wkich grew into their conservatory.
It produced staggering yields, every year.

Robert.
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Re: Vegetables

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I could cry.
In the morning I will be pulling up a couple of dozen large and productive Collard and Kale plants, and a 5 foot row of raddish. and putting them in the compost bin.
I forgot that I was not growing for piggies this year, and we can't eat them fast enough.
We have fine beans growing too large. more courgettes than you can shake a stick at.
The Garlic harvest was good, with also a crop of bulbs for the winter planting.
Eaten the first cucumber, now they will go for compost too.
First Tomatoes almost ripe, worth freezing those for the flavour.
Have let some of my favourite lettuce run to seed, the packet is empty, hope it is growable!
Life's a bitch!

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Re: Vegetables

Post by Mash »

What you need is a freezer.

Wilted kale would freeze.
As does collard & all cabbage.
Lettuce makes fantastic soup, that freezes.
Freezer cucumbers whole.. Chucks love them.
Courgettes freeze. After a flash on the griddle.

Beans pickle brilliantly.

Radishes.. Dunno.
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Re: Vegetables

Post by Mash »

Real Seeds winter order is in.

Trying some new stuff this year. Including "the thing"
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Re: Vegetables

Post by myles »

I have a decent crop of garlic (rose wight), shallots, and elephant garlic!! Onions are still in the ground.

Have not used any elephant garlic yet - is it worth growing? Advantages or not in comparison to regular garlic.

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Re: Vegetables

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We have five chest freezers and an upright one.
The balance is always elecktrickery cost over home grown veg.worth.
Collards and kale can be re-sown for a winter crop.
Obviously the meat is frozen, this year many eggs. to keep the pine marten fed in winter; then you have to look at the cost of preservation.
Sometimes the best thing is to feed the worms the excess, although tomatoes are always worth freezer space.

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Re: Vegetables

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myles wrote:
Tue Jul 27, 2021 9:57 pm
I have a decent crop of garlic (rose wight), shallots, and elephant garlic!! Onions are still in the ground.

Have not used any elephant garlic yet - is it worth growing? Advantages or not in comparison to regular garlic.
I always save the largest and best looking garlic bulbs and cloves as "seed".
So, for many years I grew a variety of Garlic named "Music", grown in Nairn, originally purchased from the veg. dept. of my local Tesco.
And it grew well.
Sadly, some of our plot harbours a fungus that causes garlic to rot.
Someone chose to plant Elephant garlic. sourced from the I.O.W. several years ago, alongside it.
Initially the Elephant was bland, but rot resistant. and much bigger.
It remains mostly rot resistant, and has acquired a stronger flavour, still bigger.
Equally, the remaining "Music" variety, is more rot resistant, and the original strengh of taste and size.
Neither allowed to flower, so, no cross pollination.
I don't understand what is going on, but am happy with the results.

Robert.
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Re: Vegetables

Post by Mash »

myles wrote:
Tue Jul 27, 2021 9:57 pm

Have not used any elephant garlic yet - is it worth growing? Advantages or not in comparison to regular garlic.
I agree with Robert much easier to grow, more resistant.

Think of it as a round leek. Roasts nicely, but isn't really very garlicky IMO
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